Ricoh Women’s British Open. Ariya Jutanugarn Wins.

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Ariya Jutanugarn of Thailand wins the Ricoh Women’s British Open.

Ricoh Women's British Open

Ariya Jutanugarn / getty

 

Ariya carded a final round of even par 72 to win the Ricoh Women’s British Open at Woburn Golf Club, with a -16 under par tournament total, giving her a three shot victory. She also becomes the first Thai lady to win a Major, and hopes it will inspire others to follow her example. I am sure Ariya will add more Major titles to her CV.

Ariya had her poor moments on the course,  dropping her first shot of the day at the par four, ninth hole, and followed that with  a double bogey 6 at the par four, 13th. Winning from previous 54 hole leads helped Ariya to come through today;

“I think I got mad after that hole.”

 “My caddie helped me a lot. He tried to calm me down, slow me down.”

“And after I make double, my fairway iron so good.  I have more confidence because I commit and it come out really good.”

“Before today, I think it’s helped me a lot, but after ANA, I’m still really nervous.”

 “But I’m pretty sure I learned a lot from that, also, because like after I feel nervous, I know what I have to do.”

“Like last few holes, I tried to be patient and to commit to my shots.”

“It was really hard, I missed a lot of putts today.”

“I think it is really important for me and Thai golfers. I want to win majors, and I hope it inspires golfers in Thailand.”

Mirim Lee, -1 under 71 today, finished tied second at 13-under par along with Mo Martin, -2 under 70 for her last round.

Mo thinks her ancestors may have given her inspiration;

“I’ve done a little bit research into my lineage, and I’ve got a little bit of English genes in me so maybe my ancestors are looking out for me.”

Stacy Lewis was in fourth place at 11-under par, she too carded -2 under 70 in the final round.

 

Ricoh Women’s British Open. Ariya Jutanugarn Has Two Shot Lead.

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Ariya Jutanugarn, from Thailand, has two shot lead in the Ricoh Women’s British Open after 54 holes at Woburn Golf Club in England.

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Ariya Jutanugarn / getty

Ariya posted a third round -6 under par 66 to pull away from the field in the Ricoh Women’s British Open with a -16 under par tournament total.

Ariya has successfully managed her hold nerve when previously holding the 54-hole lead in each of her three victories during the month of May, and feels she can cope with the pressure;

“I think I know how to play under pressure.”

 “I know like what I have to focus and the only thing I have to is like focus on what is under my control.”

In second place at -14 under par is the first and second round leader Mirim Lee, who   stumbled a bit in the third round Saturday carding -3 under 69;

“Everything was okay, just okay, not perfect, just okay.”

The 2014 Ricoh Women’s Open champion Mo Martin is in third place and ready to make a challenge at -11 under par for the tournament, a -3 under 69 third round giving her some hope that she can win again.

Catriona Matthew holds fourth place at -10 under, a -1 under 71 on Saturday denting her hopes of a chance to make history by becoming the oldest Major champion in LPGA history.

Catriona was paired with Ariya for the round and had plenty to say about her younger rival, even using her Nickname of May;

“Obviously if May keeps playing like she keeps playing, she’s going to be tough to catch but go out tomorrow and try to make as many birdies as I can,”

“Obviously playing with her, she was playing really well today and taking advantage of the good shots she was playing.”

“You do feel maybe a little bit, maybe I tried just a bit too hard on some of the putts to keep up with her.”

Ricoh Women’s British Open. Mirim Lee Keeps Lead.

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Mirim Lee keeps the lead after 36 holes of the Ricoh Women’s British Open at Woburn Golf Club.

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Mirim Lee / getty

KOR Mirim only managed a -1 under par 71 today, but it was still good enough to keep her on top of the Ricoh Women’s British Open, by just one shot over the field at -11 under par;

“I felt a little bit of nervousness but after a couple of holes I forgot about it.”

“I think a little bit of nervousness is what makes you play well.”

Sharing second place at -10 under for the tournament are CHN Shanshan Feng, -4 under 68 today, and .THA Ariya Jutanugarn with -3 under 69.

Shanshan, who was  the first Major winner from mainland China said her performance made lunch taste so much better;

“I started the round really hot today. I mean, I had four birdies in the first seven holes, and I was 5-under through ten.”

“I made a couple bogeys maybe in the middle there, misjudging about the wind.”

“But the birdie on the last hole made me really happy, so made the lunch feel better I think.”

Ariya has developed a pre-shot routine that helps her focus, and control her game;

“I think I learned how to play under pressure, how to play, really excited, I know how to play.”

“I really want to focus on what I’m doing and what I can control,” 

Catriona Matthew, with the low round of the day -7 under par 65,  who will represent Team GB in the Rio Olympic Games, is tied in fourth place, at -9 under par with Ha Na Jang -5 under 67 in the second round.

Catriona, was happy to post one of her best rounds ever;

“That’s probably one of the best rounds I’ve played.”

“I think I hit 18 greens today.”

“Just one awful shot on 16 but then followed it probably with my best shot of the day, the 4-iron on to the green.”

“Gave myself a lot of chances and holed my fair share of them today.”

Charley Hull is England’s best placed player, carding -2 under 70 today which puts her in a tie for 10th place at -5 under par;

“I didn’t get up-and-down a couple times today, just because I’m so used to this golf course playing so soft from the greens sometimes.”

“So when I’m chipping, I’m pitching it way too far, even though I know it’s bouncy, it’s just in my head, because you’re used to pitching at the pins.”

“It’s definitely good being in a good position going into the weekend.”

World number one Lydia Ko rallied well enough to make the cut at even par for the tournament, with -2 under 70 today;

“I feel like the scores are pretty low, considering what the course setups are like.”

 “I don’t feel like it’s this easy.”

 

 

 

Ricoh Women’s British Open. Mirim Lee Leads 1st Round.

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Mirim Lee, from South Korea, leads  the Ricoh Women’s British Open, after the 1st round at Woburn Golf Club, in England.

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Mirim Lee / getty

Mirim carded a stunning first round -10 under par 62 in the Ricoh Women’s British Open, and will take a comfortable three shot lead into the second round tomorrow;

“It was probably one of my best ever rounds, although I still had some errant shots.”

“I played every hole in a similar fashion, hitting fairways and greens. My best ever score was an 11 under par in LPGA Qualifying.”

Ariya Jutanugarn, from Thailand, holds second place with her respectable opening effort of -7 under par 65.

Shanshan Feng is third, the returning injured player from China had a first round -6 under par 66.

Leading home based player is Charlie Hull, -3 under 69, and T11.

Charlie is also a member of Woburn, since she was eleven years old, and knows the Marquess Course well, but that knowledge is over the long course, today the tee’s were moved up, a strange occurrence for a Major Championship. The layout for the first round  was 6,448 yards, though officials had the option to push the tees back to 6,744 or longer;

“I get a bit confused, like where to pitch it, because I’m used to coming in with long clubs, and I know what I’m doing,”

 “It’s a completely different golf course.”

“I usually play off the blues, with my friends, so sometimes I come in with five and four irons and stuff.”

“I like it when it plays long, to be honest.”

“The first tee shot today was probably the most nervous I’ve ever been on a golf course, and I never usually get nervous, it was quite weird.”

“It’s quite an easy tee shot, but I didn’t want to mess it up and make myself look even more silly.”

“It was nice to start with a birdie, as well, and I’m pretty happy with myself because I was pretty nervous on that first tee.”

 “I said to my caddie, I need to make a couple of birdies coming in, and I did.”

Making a mess of the short course was World number one Lydia Ko, recording a first round +2 over par 74, and is now twelve shots off the lead, and really no chance of catching up. The cut is currently projected at even par, so Lydia will have to play well tomorrow, and get some putts to drop, to avoid the embarrassment of a missed cut;

“Nothing was really that great. My short game wasn’t that great to cover up for the missed shots and when I did hit it close, the putts didn’t go in.”

“When that’s the case, you’re not going to shoot a low score. But hopefully a few more putts drop tomorrow.”

“I’ve just got to stay positive. There’s still a lot of golf to be played, and just hit one shot at a time.”

“It’s not an easy course but by the looks of it, it’s playing easy for a couple of the girls. But it’s because they are playing great.”

 

 

 

 

Women’s British Open. Ayako Uehara Sets the Pace.

 

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Ayako Uehara of Japan has set the pace in the opening round of the Women’s British Open at Royal Birkdale in England.

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Ayako is a three-time tournament winner on the LPGA of Japan and is currently leading the  Ricoh Women’s British Open with a -4 under-par 68 opening round. She said the fine round was due mainly to solid putting and being in good company;

“I feel so great right now, because I shoot 4‑under today, and I played with Stacy Lewis and Charley Hull today, I enjoyed so much.”

“I had many good birdie chances but I couldn’t make it.  But this week, so good, so I have confidence right now.”

 Mo Martin from the United States in alone in second place, just one shot back at -3 under par following her first round -3 under par 69, while  Mina Harigae, Morgan Pressel and Australian Sarah Kemp are a stroke further behind on -2 under-par.

Sarah was happy with her -2 under par effort, despite getting into trouble a few times, remarking how tough the course is;

“I got into trouble a couple of times but I just tried to make a bogey and not make a really big number, so I think I did that well today.”

“I think it’s one of the hardest golf courses I’ve ever played.  We were lucky today with the weather.  It wasn’t as windy, but I played yesterday, a practice round yesterday, and it was pretty windy.  It’s quite tight and it’s so intimidating off the tee.  There’s a lot of shots where you can’t see the ball land and when you get up there, the fairway looks about ten yards wide, so it’s definitely up there with the top five hardest golf courses I’ve ever played.  But, one of the best golf courses I’ve ever played, too.”

Holly Clyburn finished as the best placed English player at -1 under par 71, she is sharing sixth spot with Stacy Lewis, So Yeon Ryu and Amy Yang.

Holly was also very happy to shoot under par today;

“I am, very happy, to go out there and shoot under par straight off is very nice. I started bogey, bogey, but it’s not really bogey, bogey.  I don’t look at it like that.  I gave myself a lot of opportunities and a lot of just shaving the hole, and after how I’ve putted the past few weeks, I’m very happy.  I’m so much more confident over the ball and I’m happy to go out there and hole some putts.”

Stacy thought anything under par was a good effort today;

“I think anything under par on this golf course is a good score, it definitely could have been better. Didn’t hit the ball great today. But managed to get the ball in the hole and posted a red number, which is good.”

  Charley Hull was one of 23 players to take a double bogey, or worse at the first hole, she admitted to a few nerves in posting her +1 over par first round;

 “I just think because it’s kind of a tight tee shot the first hole, but it’s not that tight, but it’s just, you know, first tee shot can be a little bit nervy.”

Ricoh Womens British Open. Na Yeon Takes Command at Half Way Stage.

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Na Yeon Choi takes command of the Ricoh Womens British Open at St Andrews at the half way stage of the competition.

Na Yeon Choi / Getty

At a fairly breezy St Andrews Na Yeon shot her second consecutive -5 under par round of 67, to lead the tournament at -10 under par. 

Na Yeon said she was pleased with her two rounds, especially the one today in the windier conditions;

“I’m very satisfied the last two rounds.  You know, especially today, the weather wasn’t good, it was very hard.  But my focus was very good and my caddie helped me a lot, and you know, I had a daily goal every day so I just tried to stick with the goal.  It could be like par is 74 or 75 today, but I didn’t care, like every hole, par 3, par 4, par 5, doesn’t matter for me.  I just try to play one shot at a time and I think that’s why I had great results.”

Mikki Saki is in second place following her magical second round of  -6 under par, 66, which included two two’s. A hole out for Eagle on two of the par fours on the front nine of the Old Course at St. Andrews, holes 4 and 7. Both shots came from over 100 yards as she holed one with an eight iron and the other with a wedge. She was asked if she had ever done that in a tournament before;

“First time, because it is a major and we are here at the Old Course and surrounded by so much history then it must rate as my best ever round.”

Morgan Pressel is in third place at -8 under par, she had a more modest second round, -2 under par, 70. Morgan used not to like links golf, a bit like Phil Mickelson, there could be a link there; he also wants to be on the Solheim Cup Team;

” Everything happens for a reason, and I think that my past struggles here at St. Andrews as well as links golf in general my first two years on Tour taught me a lot. At this point, you know, I’ve played well for two days, and I’m more focused on this tournament”

Treble chasing Inbee Park struggled as the winds picked up on Friday afternoon on the Old Course at St. Andrews, carding a +1 over par 73 to put her at -2 under-par for the championship, a long way back;

“When you experience something big like this, some kind of big pressure like this, you’re just really not afraid of any kind of pressure. How can it get bigger than this?  If you experience something like this, you’re just ready to go and ready to experience something, anything’s going to be less than this.”

Good Luck Inbee.

 

Ricoh British Women’s Open, Jiyai Shin of South Korea Wins

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Jiyai Shin 

Hearty congratulations to Jiyai Shin of South Korea, she produced one of the finest performances of her illustrious career when she defied atrocious weather to close with a battling one over par 73 and claim a domineering nine shot victory in the 2012 Ricoh Women’s British Open at a wet and windswept Royal Liverpool Golf Club. Her easy cruise to victory  means that for the first time in golfing history Asians have won all four of the women’s Majors in a single calendar year with South Korea’s Sun Young Yoo winning the Kraft Nabisco Championship, China’s Shanshan Feng claiming the LPGA Championship and South Korea’s Na Yeon Choi beating the field at the US Women’s Open. There was no other competitor who finished in under par, Inbee Park was alone in second place with a tournament total of even par. Third place went to Paula Creamer of America. finishing with a score of +1 over par.

This Jiyai’s second win at this event, last time in 2008, today she was really happy to be a two-time winner of the trophy;

“I can’t put into words how happy I feel to win the title for a second time. My first win in 2008 changed my life. This week, this win, I think it will change it too.  I said at the start of the week I wanted to play every round in one under par so to get to nine under in this weather on a course as tough as this is incredible. Now I know I can get a good score on any course, I’m pretty sure of that. I can’t tell you why so many Asian players are winning majors at the moment, maybe it’s down to hard work. Maybe it’s luck, or a bit of both.”

Lydia Ko arrived at Hoylake having won this year’s US Women’s Amateur and then followed that up by becoming the youngest ever winner on the LPGA Tour, winning the CN Canadian Open at just of 15 years old. Here at Royal Liverpool she won The Smyth Salver, which is awarded to the leading amateur, putting together rounds of 72, 71, 76 and a last round of 78 for a +9 over par total of 297 and a two-stroke victory over England’s Holly Clyburn.

Lydia said of her first British Open experience;

“I have got the award for the leading amateur and that’s what I wanted after I made the cut. This is my first experience of the British Open, I didn’t play as well as I wanted but I have won the amateur prize so it wasn’t a bad day. It was playing really tough out there, this is one of the hardest courses I have ever played and there were times when the weather made it almost impossible to play.”